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museumuesum:

On Kawara
21 OCT.68, 1968
acrylic on canvas and accompanying artist-made box with corresponding newspaper clipping, 8 x 10 inches each

Noting: El Mercurio

museumuesum:

On Kawara

21 OCT.68, 1968

acrylic on canvas and accompanying artist-made box with corresponding newspaper clipping, 8 x 10 inches each

Noting: El Mercurio

“… You can tell yourself that getting flak from both ends is a pretty good indication you’re on the right track. It’s short-sighted glory, an easy way of setting yourself above the fray. The times are more demanding than that. If I ever had a passion in the field of politics, it’s a passion for understanding. Understanding how people manage to live on a planet like ours. Understanding how they seek, how they try, how they make mistakes, how they get over them, how they learn, how they lose their way… Which immediately put me on the side of people who seek and make mistakes, as opposed to those who seek nothing, except to conserve, defend themselves, an deny all the rest.”

—Chris Marker, in 1997, on photographs he took of North Koreans in 1957. Found in a rare out of print booklet in the Peter Blum Gallery. (via Aaron Stewart-Ahn, twice)

“… You can tell yourself that getting flak from both ends is a pretty good indication you’re on the right track. It’s short-sighted glory, an easy way of setting yourself above the fray. The times are more demanding than that. If I ever had a passion in the field of politics, it’s a passion for understanding. Understanding how people manage to live on a planet like ours. Understanding how they seek, how they try, how they make mistakes, how they get over them, how they learn, how they lose their way… Which immediately put me on the side of people who seek and make mistakes, as opposed to those who seek nothing, except to conserve, defend themselves, an deny all the rest.”

—Chris Marker, in 1997, on photographs he took of North Koreans in 1957. Found in a rare out of print booklet in the Peter Blum Gallery. (via Aaron Stewart-Ahn, twice)

I’m going to use today’s announcement from Flickr about Flickr PARK or BIRD and the mention in the text of this post to two Darren Bradley Flickr images as my cue to make a semi-regular pointer to my Flickr favorites, the first many of which look like the images above at the time of this post.

A sequence of panels from “Pup Ponders the Heat Death of the Universe

“The only word I have for the Chilean landscape is “majestic”. #BlueDot #Chile” —Alexander Gerst

“The only word I have for the Chilean landscape is “majestic”. #BlueDot #Chile” —Alexander Gerst

fieldworkk:

Starting on the installation for tomorrow’s opening.

More on Fieldwork.

fieldworkk:

Starting on the installation for tomorrow’s opening.

More on Fieldwork.

fieldworkk:

Grouping / processing / remembering / arranging

More on Fieldwork.

fieldworkk:

Grouping / processing / remembering / arranging

More on Fieldwork.

fieldworkk:

A surprise whilst photographing found objects for the Fieldwork Map: the camera reveals details the eye cannot see.

More on Fieldwork.

fieldworkk:

This crashed DC-3 US plane lies crumbling 4km out from the road, on the vast black sand beach of Solheimasandur, near the southernmost tip of Iceland’s mainland. See if you can find it on the Fieldwork Map and examine the objects found there.

I’m a sucker for anything about Iceland (more evidence), but I really like the Fieldwork project by John Rogers and Amy Tavern. It serves as a great example for student-led explorations.


  The project is a multidisciplinary “fieldwork”, presented online & IRL, that incorporates ideas of space, movement, memory and technology; place, image, experience and object.


I’ve collected several references here.

fieldworkk:

This crashed DC-3 US plane lies crumbling 4km out from the road, on the vast black sand beach of Solheimasandur, near the southernmost tip of Iceland’s mainland. See if you can find it on the Fieldwork Map and examine the objects found there.

I’m a sucker for anything about Iceland (more evidence), but I really like the Fieldwork project by John Rogers and Amy Tavern. It serves as a great example for student-led explorations.

The project is a multidisciplinary “fieldwork”, presented online & IRL, that incorporates ideas of space, movement, memory and technology; place, image, experience and object.

I’ve collected several references here.

I’m Nobody! Who are you?

by Emily Dickinson (via Matt Thomas)

I’m Nobody! Who are you?
Are you – Nobody – too?
Then there’s a pair of us!
Don’t tell! they’d advertise – you know!

How dreary – to be – Somebody!
How public – like a Frog –
To tell one’s name – the livelong June –
To an admiring Bog!

Present Tense

A few days ago, I read these words from Laura Poitras in a profile by George Packer in The New Yorker:

I’m interested in how people understand things in present tense, and not how they tell the story back to themselves in the past. That’s why I’m not that interested in interviews. People create these narratives of themselves, and it becomes a kind of locked path. All the uncertainty and danger and risk and decision-making are ripped from the telling.

Today, Sara Hendren shared these somewhat similar lines from Wallace Stegner's Angle of Repose (1971):

There is another physical law that teases me, too: the Doppler Effect. The sound of anything coming at you — a train, say, or the future — has a higher pitch than the sound of the same thing going away. If you have perfect pitch and a head for mathematics you can compute the speed of the object by the interval between its arriving and departing sounds. I have neither perfect pitch nor a head for mathematics, and anyway who wants to compute the speed of history? Like all falling bodies, it constantly accelerates. But I would like to hear your life as you heard it, coming at you, instead of hearing it as I do, a somber sound of expectations reduced, desires blunted, hopes deferred or abandoned, chances lost, defeats accepted, griefs borne.

owengentillustration:

Your Blissful Shadow - for Rebecca & Sarah

owengentillustration:

Your Blissful Shadow - for Rebecca & Sarah

Snøhetta designs for Norway’s 1000 kroner note (See also “Snøhetta gives new look to back of norway’s banknotes.” Image captured from this PDF.)

Snøhetta designs for Norway’s 1000 kroner note (See also “Snøhetta gives new look to back of norway’s banknotes.” Image captured from this PDF.)

Thorncrown Chapel, E. Fay Jones, 1980

Thorncrown Chapel, E. Fay Jones, 1980