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Untitled 2011, Yukultji Napangati (via Adbusters)

Untitled 2011, Yukultji Napangati (via Adbusters)

Dog Philosophy Three Panel Soul, Matt Boyd and Ian McConville (via Anne)

Dog Philosophy Three Panel Soul, Matt Boyd and Ian McConville (via Anne)

“This awning is pretty much a PKD story in and of itself.” —Adam Rothstein

“This awning is pretty much a PKD story in and of itself.” —Adam Rothstein

One more Ray Johnson (via NYTimes) and a pointer to the Ray Johnson Estate Tumblr

One more Ray Johnson (via NYTimes) and a pointer to the Ray Johnson Estate Tumblr

Holland Cotter on Ray Johnson:


  He would almost certainly have leveled a cool stare at the 21st-century interest — amounting to a faith — in collectivity, collaboration and social practice as utopian models. Mail art, on the surface, looked democratic, nonelitist, even populist; theoretically, anyone could join in. Yet Johnson’s reports from New York Correspondence School meetings speak of members who were summarily banished from the roster for some infraction or other. Johnson himself, in what feels like a punitive spirit, dropped people from his mailing list. Was such policing meant to be tongue-in-cheek, mocking how the real world operated? Impossible to say. Johnson wore ambiguity like a shield.”


That’s from Cotter’s review of Not Nothing: Selected Writings by Ray Johnson 1954-1994. From George Vasey’s review of the same in Kaleidoscope:


  Johnson was a pioneer of Pop, Conceptual and Mail art, yet the artist refuted all of these terms. He was an increasingly reclusive figure who, to paraphrase writer William S. Wilson, “made art that was not about social comment but of sociability,” exploring new interfaces between his work and its audiences (and collaborators). His methods were temporal as much as they were spatial - lacking finality, Johnson’s practice embraced contingency and process over a finished product. These strategies resist the exhibition form, and one can see how the intimacy and transportability of the book might offer the perfect platform for his often diaristic work.


See also The Paper Snake by Ray Johnson, republished to accompany Not Nothing, and previous posts tagged Ray Johnson.

Holland Cotter on Ray Johnson:

He would almost certainly have leveled a cool stare at the 21st-century interest — amounting to a faith — in collectivity, collaboration and social practice as utopian models. Mail art, on the surface, looked democratic, nonelitist, even populist; theoretically, anyone could join in. Yet Johnson’s reports from New York Correspondence School meetings speak of members who were summarily banished from the roster for some infraction or other. Johnson himself, in what feels like a punitive spirit, dropped people from his mailing list. Was such policing meant to be tongue-in-cheek, mocking how the real world operated? Impossible to say. Johnson wore ambiguity like a shield.”

That’s from Cotter’s review of Not Nothing: Selected Writings by Ray Johnson 1954-1994. From George Vasey’s review of the same in Kaleidoscope:

Johnson was a pioneer of Pop, Conceptual and Mail art, yet the artist refuted all of these terms. He was an increasingly reclusive figure who, to paraphrase writer William S. Wilson, “made art that was not about social comment but of sociability,” exploring new interfaces between his work and its audiences (and collaborators). His methods were temporal as much as they were spatial - lacking finality, Johnson’s practice embraced contingency and process over a finished product. These strategies resist the exhibition form, and one can see how the intimacy and transportability of the book might offer the perfect platform for his often diaristic work.

See also The Paper Snake by Ray Johnson, republished to accompany Not Nothing, and previous posts tagged Ray Johnson.

Seams and Scars

Anne Galloway (PDF, quoted previously):

[S]eams and scars point to where we have in the past made or become something else—and yet they also remind us that we can do so again in the future. If we treat them not as irregularities to be hidden but as indicators of our abilities to intervene in the world, seams and scars offer us glimpses of how we shape and re-shape ourselves, each other, and the worlds in which we live.

Lebbeus Woods in Radical Reconstruction (via faroleiro):

The scar is a deeper level of reconstruction that fuses the new and the old, reconciling, coalescing them, without compromising either one in the name of some contextual form of unity. The scar is a mark of pride and of honor, both for what has been lost and what has been gained. It cannot be erased, except by the most cosmetic means. It cannot be elevated beyond what it is, a mutant tissue, the precursor of unpredictable regenerations. To accept the scar is to accept existence. Healing is not an illusory, cosmetic process, but something that—by articulating differences—both deeply divides and joins together.

Tagged seams and scars.

Human cognitive diversity exists for a reason; our differences are the genius – and the conscience – of our species. Carol Black, “A Thousand Rivers: What the modern world has forgotten about children and learning" (additional pull quotes here, but full read recommended)
Front cover of the BEE (Bulletin of Environmental Education), March 1972 (via
Catherine Burke, ““Fleeting pockets of anarchy”: Streetwork. The exploding school”)

Front cover of the BEE (Bulletin of Environmental Education), March 1972 (via
Catherine Burke, ““Fleeting pockets of anarchy”: Streetwork. The exploding school”)

It may be mere historical conditioning, but when I see a man or a woman alone, he or she looks mysterious to me, which is only to say that for a moment I see another human being clearly. Marilynne Robinson in her essay “When I was a Child” in her collection When I Was a Child I Read Books (via Mills Baker, who writes, “In truth, the only intellectually defensible posture is one of humility…”)
Next Stop Atlantic (one of a series), Stephen Mallon
comiccartography:

Blast Into Space
artist unknown
Uncanny X-Men #199 (and probably elsewhere too)

comiccartography:

Blast Into Space

artist unknown

Uncanny X-Men #199 (and probably elsewhere too)

In Search of the Miraculous (One Night in Los Angeles), Bas Jan Ader, 1973 (via East of Borneo)

In Search of the Miraculous (One Night in Los Angeles), Bas Jan Ader, 1973 (via East of Borneo)