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Untitled, Justyn Hegreberg, 2014 (via randomamberstars)

Untitled, Justyn Hegreberg, 2014 (via randomamberstars)

“Asking me to take and exam without my box is like asking someone without a box to take an exam with one.”

“This is who I am, teacher.”

A commentary on learning differences and cognitive diversity in another frame from Taiyō Matsumoto's GoGo Monster.

“Asking me to take and exam without my box is like asking someone without a box to take an exam with one.”

“This is who I am, teacher.”

A commentary on learning differences and cognitive diversity in another frame from Taiyō Matsumoto's GoGo Monster.

Timely frame from Taiyō Matsumoto's GoGo Monster: “It’s hot!”

Timely frame from Taiyō Matsumoto's GoGo Monster: “It’s hot!”

I do not think that a teacher should teach something to the student. I think the teacher should discover what it is that the student knows—and that’s not easy to find out—and then, of course, encourage the student to be courageous with respect to his knowledge, courageous and practical and so forth—in other words, to bring his knowledge to fruition. Don’t you think? Ev Grimes as quoted by Kay Larson in Where the Heart Beats (not fully sure it’s Grimes as the footnote is hard to parse)

Details from Metro, Alessandro Gallo, 2011 (via slavin)

Smart Birds Open Doors, Grant Hughes

Lisa Wade writes:

[…] This is a story, obviously, of how smart birds are, but here’s what struck me: we often think about human technology as for humans. In this case, however, birds adapted the technology for their own very similar needs (to get in and out).

If the workers had installed an older human technology — plain old doors — the birds would have been out of luck because they don’t have thumbs and the strength to manipulate an environment built for humans. But motion activated doors make both thumbs and strength irrelevant, so now birds are our functional equals.

This is fascinating, yeah? Our technology has advanced to the point where we’re potentially undermining our own evolutionary advantages.

(via Anne)

Tolerance can never embrace. It suffers differences, instead of being hospitable to them. Though more gentle or discreet, tolerance is merely a different form of intolerance. “Toleration,” Goethe observed, “ought in reality to be merely a transitory mood. It must lead to recognition. To tolerate is to insult.” Hospitality, in contrast, embraces the radical pluralism of reality: the incommensurable otherness of the other. Hospitality means opening your arms and the doors of your heart to those who are radically different. Gustavo Esteva, as quoted by Matt Hern in Common Ground in a Liquid City and “In Defense of an Urban Future” (transcription via salted lion)
To begin to think of the possibility of collaboration among the disciplines, we must realize that the ‘two cultures’ exist as such because both of them belong to the one culture of division and dislocation, opposition and competition… the culture of colonialism and industrialism. Wendell Berry, Life is a Miracle (via Selin Jessa)
“Yuki Kageyama: Exploring Japan’s Secret Hideouts for Grown-Ups”


  A base or a hideout. Well, whatever you called it — you can bet that you had one as a kid. But it’s not just about larking around when young. Hideouts can also be hubs for alternate ways of living, a refuge and a means of returning to a more innocent childhood world.
  
  Hideouts are necessary spaces in everyday life and function like an abode. Since we are thinking about all things related to Japanese homes at the moment, when we heard about a new book by Yuki Kageyama called “Secret Hideouts for Grown-Ups”, we were intrigued to say the least. It introduces a range of examples from around Japan and also pointers on how to create a hideout yourself.

Yuki Kageyama: Exploring Japan’s Secret Hideouts for Grown-Ups

A base or a hideout. Well, whatever you called it — you can bet that you had one as a kid. But it’s not just about larking around when young. Hideouts can also be hubs for alternate ways of living, a refuge and a means of returning to a more innocent childhood world.

Hideouts are necessary spaces in everyday life and function like an abode. Since we are thinking about all things related to Japanese homes at the moment, when we heard about a new book by Yuki Kageyama called “Secret Hideouts for Grown-Ups”, we were intrigued to say the least. It introduces a range of examples from around Japan and also pointers on how to create a hideout yourself.

sequentialstate:

Taiyo Matsumoto has a penchant for writing stories about children. He examines the world through a child’s eyes, a child’s hopes and dreams, and most importantly a child’s questions. Questions are how Matsumoto starts his latest English release, Sunny, published under Viz’s Sig IKKI line. Not with panoramas or images of far-fetched monsters like his earlier works, Tekkonkinkreet and GoGo Monster, but with questions. The difference sets the tone for a series that looks at Matsumoto’s own childhood.

Sunny is about a group of kids living at the Star Children’s Home. Each chapter of the comic asks a new question and each chapter is a moment in the lives of these children seen through a different character’s eyes. The connecting point is the Star Children’s Home, a sort of foster agency/orphanage and an old rusted out Datsun Sunny that the children nap, play, and dream in. For some, the Sunny is a place to escape, driving on the moon or playing outlaw like the brash, white-haired Harou. For others, it is a place to remember, driving back home to the family that abandoned you, like newcomer Sei.

Part of what makes Sunny so riveting is its true-to-life styling. Author Matsumoto is writing from experience as a child growing up in an orphanage. Whatever it is, Sunny feels like a combination confessional, re-imagining, and autobiography. Matsumoto uses this part of his life to explore the worries of children and the way they deal with them. The angers and quarrels of children are all there, with hogging toys and worrying about four-leaf clovers. The underlying questions about why the children are at the home, where their parents are, why some children look forward to visitation days and others dread them all dwell underneath the play and the boisterous energy. The combination of these questions and the children’s circumstances lends Sunny a melancholy that is pervasive.

Matsumoto’s sketchy artwork is complemented by earth tones and the coloring work of his wife, Saho Tono. The mix of sketchiness and painterly aesthetic makes the whole book a joy to look at. The art conveys just the right amount of detail and energy, while still maintaining a reminiscent quality. The use of watercolor with Matsumoto’s usual art and powerful lines bring a depth to Sunny that shows that despite his proven strength as a cartoonist, Matsumoto continues to grow and evolve.

Sunny is Matsumoto writing from a place we haven’t seen before despite using similar themes. While I’ve really enjoyed his previous work, none of it has resonated as well for me as Sunny has. Sunny is an expressive, beautiful, thought-provoking comic that deserves your attention. Recommended.

As Sophia, who pointed me here, says, “We need to get our hands on this.” Tekkonkinkreet, both the manga and the anime, is a favorite. (via eliu-shi)

I AM ELEVEN is hitting selective theaters on September 12.

Australian filmmaker Genevieve Bailey travelled the world for six years talking with 11-year-olds to compose this insightful, funny and moving documentary portrait of childhood. From an orphanage in India, to a single-parent household in inner-city Melbourne, to bathing with elephants in Thailand, I AM ELEVEN explores the lives and thoughts of children from 15 countries. I AM ELEVEN weaves together deeply personal and at times hilarious portraits of what it means to sit at this transitional age. These young minds provide us with a powerful insight into the future of our world.

These children share their thoughts on a range of subjects such as love, war, global warming, music, terrorism, culture, family, happiness, religion and the future. Each of their situations allows a single glimpse into a young mind, and combine to provide a powerful insight into the future of our world. As straight up and personal as the ’7 Up’ series, and with the comedy and honesty of ‘Spellbound’, this documentary enables us to explore an age where these ‘not quite kids, not quite teenagers’ briefly linger, between the frank openness and sometimes naivety of childhood, and the sharp and surprisingly brave wisdom and knowing of adulthood. As much as it is a story about them, it is a story with them, of what it is like to be eleven today.

More information on the I AM ELEVEN website and on the I AM ELEVEN Vimeo page.

This pavilion (via referencescout, where there are more photos) by Rintala Eggertsson Architects for SALT Festival in Sandhornøya, Norway feels a little Ritoque (e[ad]), a little Strandbeest (Theo Jansen), a little Howl’s Moving Castle (Hayao Miyazaki), and a little Walking City. And speaking of Walking City, the other day Anne pointed to Rod McLaren’s “Life in the Walking City.” Fun read.

This pavilion (via referencescout, where there are more photos) by Rintala Eggertsson Architects for SALT Festival in Sandhornøya, Norway feels a little Ritoque (e[ad]), a little Strandbeest (Theo Jansen), a little Howl’s Moving Castle (Hayao Miyazaki), and a little Walking City. And speaking of Walking City, the other day Anne pointed to Rod McLaren’s “Life in the Walking City.” Fun read.