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Funny how our busted weird messy unwieldy code constructions resemble… every other human endeavor over a certain (tiny) size. Erin Kissane.
Education is what people do to you and learning is what you do for yourself. You’re not going to be on top of mountain all by yourself with a #2 pencil… What we need to learn is how to learn. I don’t like the word ‘futurist.’ I think we should be now-ists. Focus on being connected, always learning, fully aware and super present. Joi Ito
Keita Takahashi (nodo-chinko):

DAY_091: I got some Japanese textbook for music and science at son’s preschool. I have totally forgotten what I learned at elementary and middle school, but looks interesting.

Keita Takahashi (nodo-chinko):

DAY_091: I got some Japanese textbook for music and science at son’s preschool. I have totally forgotten what I learned at elementary and middle school, but looks interesting.
In a postindustrial society, understanding is reached through negotiation between the individual and his or her culture. Intelligence thus becomes communal, creative, and communicational, reflecting an ability to bring relevant “knowledge to bear on a novel situation” and a context in which “understandings can only be apprehended and appreciated if they are performed by a student.” The productive exchange between teachers and learners… is interactive, surprising and challenging as the exchange between performance artists and their audiences. Hannah Higgins, Fluxus Experience (via bobbyjgeorge)
Learning is permanent for all of us regardless of age. Curiosity feeds the desire to know. The call to teach stems from the pleasure of transmitting life: neither an imposition nor a power relation, it is pure gift, like life, from which it flows. Economic totalitarianism has ripped learning away from life, whose creative conscience it ought to be. We want to disseminate everywhere this poetry of knowledge that gives itself. Against school as a closed-off space (a barrack in the past, a slave market nowadays), we must invent nomadic learning. Raoul Vaneigem, 2009
Theory is taught so as to make the student believe that he or she can become a marxist, a feminist, an afrocentrist, or a deconstructionist with about the same effort and commitment required in choosing items from a menu. Culture and Imperialism, Edward Said (via et—cetera via kenyatta)
nicolefenton:

All words are words

Things That Are, by Amy Leach

nicolefenton:

All words are words

Things That Are, by Amy Leach

Pages from Black Mountain College Bulletin 9, Spring Semester 1952 (via mymaybellene via jmek)

We have been trained or conditioned by society to see children in a certain way. There is a different way to see children. To get rid of preconceived ideas about childhood. About certain things we do about judgement of the child. Criticising the child or looking at the child as someone inferior or someone small. Silvia Dubovoy (via bobbyjgeorge)
Continued in their present patterns of fragmented unrelation, our school curricula will insure a citizenry unable to understand the cybernated world in which they live. Any subject taken in depth at once relates to other subjects. Marshall McLuhan, Understanding Media (via bobbyjgeorge)
Tibor Kalman (again, full text version here, this image via iwillfindanotheryou via izziezahorian)

Tibor Kalman (again, full text version here, this image via iwillfindanotheryou via izziezahorian)

The “DIY TV Trailer" for DIY's new DIY TV channel on YouTube.

If you’re looking for a start with deschooling and a critique of compulsory schooling, you can’t go wrong with Matt Hern. Here he is speaking at AERO 2005: “Possibility in the Face of Probability

What people somehow (inadvertently, I’m sure) forgot to mention when we were children was that we need to make messes in order to find out who we are and why we are here—and, by extension, what we’re supposed to be writing. Anne Lamott (via nicolefenton)