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“Asking me to take and exam without my box is like asking someone without a box to take an exam with one.”

“This is who I am, teacher.”

A commentary on learning differences and cognitive diversity in another frame from Taiyō Matsumoto's GoGo Monster.

“Asking me to take and exam without my box is like asking someone without a box to take an exam with one.”

“This is who I am, teacher.”

A commentary on learning differences and cognitive diversity in another frame from Taiyō Matsumoto's GoGo Monster.

I do not think that a teacher should teach something to the student. I think the teacher should discover what it is that the student knows—and that’s not easy to find out—and then, of course, encourage the student to be courageous with respect to his knowledge, courageous and practical and so forth—in other words, to bring his knowledge to fruition. Don’t you think? Ev Grimes as quoted by Kay Larson in Where the Heart Beats (not fully sure it’s Grimes as the footnote is hard to parse)
To begin to think of the possibility of collaboration among the disciplines, we must realize that the ‘two cultures’ exist as such because both of them belong to the one culture of division and dislocation, opposition and competition… the culture of colonialism and industrialism. Wendell Berry, Life is a Miracle (via Selin Jessa)
We’ve overdone it. We wanted to protect kids from working in factories 100 years ago… but we have excluded so much from the life of the community that they don’t feel like they have anything to contribute, and they don’t have as much opportunity to learn. Barbara Rogoff, from “What ‘age segregation’ does to America
[U]ntil the late 19th century, according to historian Howard Chudacoff, age wasn’t such a defining fact about people’s lives. [… F]or most of the country’s history, people of different ages tended to mingle: Families were bigger, generations often worked side by side, and kids and adults got their entertainment at the same county fairs. Leon Neyfakh, “What ‘age segregation’ does to America

Art

art of the everyday
art found where the people are

art in physical places
art on the street and in homes
art that is mobile
art on wheels and on foot
art in jugaad
art in informal architecture
art catered by paleteros

art found in digital spaces
art in the photography of Instagram
art in the film of Vimeo
art in the poetry of Twitter
art in the performance of the open web
art made by the Internet

art that transcends disciplines
art that is polyglot
art that is slow and small
art that is process
art that is conversation
art that is collaborative
art that is participatory
art that is distributed
art that is democratic

art that is learning
art that counteracts poor education policy
art that leaves the MFA behind
art that does not intimidate, but that welcomes
art that does not colonize, but that listens and empathizes
art that distributes bullhorns and positions lenses

art that goes beyond provocation
art that becomes a prototype
art that creates pockets of utopia
art that becomes a source of change
art of progress
art of living

art as life
life as art

Human cognitive diversity exists for a reason; our differences are the genius – and the conscience – of our species. Carol Black, “A Thousand Rivers: What the modern world has forgotten about children and learning" (additional pull quotes here, but full read recommended)
Front cover of the BEE (Bulletin of Environmental Education), March 1972 (via
Catherine Burke, ““Fleeting pockets of anarchy”: Streetwork. The exploding school”)

Front cover of the BEE (Bulletin of Environmental Education), March 1972 (via
Catherine Burke, ““Fleeting pockets of anarchy”: Streetwork. The exploding school”)

Their openness to new experiences reminded me to be more open in turn to their unique ways of visiting and looking at art. Marianna Adams, “Falling in Love with Your Visitors
I want to pay more attention to invisible pedagogies – both how the physical space itself instructs and how actions from people (me included) communicate behaviors and attitudes. Marianna Adams, “Towards a More Mindful Practice

Rigid Ego Habits

Kay Larson, writing about the reaction to Marcel Duchamp’s Fountain in Where the Heart Beats: John Cage, Zen Buddhism, and the Inner Life of Artists:

The eruptions of violated sensibility were coming from human beings, whose unexamined expectations, habitual beliefs, moral rigidity, squeamishness about the body, conditioned responses, and exalted sense of propriety were causing howls of anguish. This raging cyclone of emotion is a succinct definition of dukkah—the Sanskrit word that sums up the suffering of cyclical existence, brought on by our ego fixations. Buddhists call this realm “samsara,” the troubled world created by our rigid ego habits: our clinging to the categories we invent, investing them with reality, punishing those who don’t agree.

See also the synopsis of “The Inadequacy of Mass Education & the Case for Autodidacticism" by Jordan Bates:

(…) autodidacticism is an attitude one brings to learning, an attitude which is essential to gaining substantive insight both within and beyond the confines of traditional educational institutions. This attitude consists of a willingness to question all of one’s assumptions and preconceived ideas, a strong desire to learn and to apply what is learned, and a fiery love for knowledge in and of itself.

Sounds like one way to combat the rigid ego habits. See also cultural dark matter.

Letter from Barrowford School (@BarrowfordSch) to sixth grade students at the end of their primary school years and with regard to their standardized test results:


  Please find enclosed your end of KS2 test results. We are very proud as you demonstrated huge amounts of commitment and tried your very best during this tricky week.
  
  However, we are concerned that these tests do not always assess all of what it is that make each of you special and unique. The people who create these tests and score them do not know each of you—the way your teachers do, the way i hope to, and certainly not the way your families do. They do not know that many of you speak two languages. They do not know that you can play a musical instrument or that you can dance or paint a picture. They do not know that your friends count on you to be there for them or that your laughter can brighten the dreariest day. They do not know that you write poetry or songs, play or participate in sports, wonder about the future, or that sometimes you take care of your little brother or sister after school. They do not know that you have travelled to a really neat place or that you know how to tell a great story or that you really love spending time with special family members and friends. They do not know that you can be trustworthy, kind or thoughtful, and that you try, every day, to be your very best… the scores you get will tell you something, but they will not tell you everything.
  
  So enjoy your results and be very proud of these but remember there are many ways of being smart.


Note: The contents appear to have come from another source.

(via Richard Wiseman)

Letter from Barrowford School (@BarrowfordSch) to sixth grade students at the end of their primary school years and with regard to their standardized test results:

Please find enclosed your end of KS2 test results. We are very proud as you demonstrated huge amounts of commitment and tried your very best during this tricky week.

However, we are concerned that these tests do not always assess all of what it is that make each of you special and unique. The people who create these tests and score them do not know each of you—the way your teachers do, the way i hope to, and certainly not the way your families do. They do not know that many of you speak two languages. They do not know that you can play a musical instrument or that you can dance or paint a picture. They do not know that your friends count on you to be there for them or that your laughter can brighten the dreariest day. They do not know that you write poetry or songs, play or participate in sports, wonder about the future, or that sometimes you take care of your little brother or sister after school. They do not know that you have travelled to a really neat place or that you know how to tell a great story or that you really love spending time with special family members and friends. They do not know that you can be trustworthy, kind or thoughtful, and that you try, every day, to be your very best… the scores you get will tell you something, but they will not tell you everything.

So enjoy your results and be very proud of these but remember there are many ways of being smart.

Note: The contents appear to have come from another source.

(via Richard Wiseman)

In an age of dramatic economic and political inequality, Swartz’s death is proof that it does not matter how talented you are or how hard you work—American meritocracy is a sham. If Swartz, a rich tech genius with an unparalleled network of powerful friends and a remarkable track record of success, couldn’t live an ethical, dignified life, then who can? Our contemporary culture is crippled by increasingly Soviet-style barriers against all who challenge the status quo. It has criminal statutes so broad that basically everyone is a lawbreaker, and selective prosecution has become a mechanism for ordering our politics. It demands deep moral compromise just to live with minimal interference from authority. It requires that, to be a ‘success’ like Karp, you must have not only the talent to build appealing social systems, but also the lack of a moral compass involved in using those social systems to manipulate others. The ethic of this approach is designed by those who fear only those risks associated with human freedom. Matt Stoller, “Aaron Swartz and 21st-Century Martyrdom" (via Alec Resnick)
A mind that moves associatively (as my mind does and probably your mind too) like a firefly in a grassy yard on a late June evening, has more fun (and other things too, of course, like static, like trouble) than a mind that moves logically or even chronologically. Pam Houston, “Corn Maze" (via Nicole)
A wish: to be a coyote (or small pack of them) in your museum, in your library, in your school, in your city, in your organization, in your [_______]. (image via womanhouse)

A wish: to be a coyote (or small pack of them) in your museum, in your library, in your school, in your city, in your organization, in your [_______]. (image via womanhouse)